How Much is a 1946 Walking Liberty Half Dollar Worth? (Price Chart)

The Walking Liberty half dollar has a gorgeous and unique design that stands out among other beautiful American coins. Even though the US Mint hasn’t struck them for more than half a century, they are still popular and incredibly collectible.

The US Mint produced millions of these coins from 1916 to 1947, but those in uncirculated condition are rare nowadays. Typically, the 1946 Half dollar value depends on the mint mark and overall look, but specimens in the top-notch state are worth tens of thousands of dollars. Let’s see.

1946 Walking Liberty Half-dollar History

The Walking Liberty halves were produced from 1916 to 1947 in Philadelphia, San Francisco, and Denver. Those minted in the Philadelphia mint don’t have the mint mark, but you can see letters S or D on pieces struck in two other mints.

1946 Walking Liberty half dollar

Location Year Minted
Philadelphia 1946 12,118,000
San Francisco 1946 S 3,724,000
Denver 1946 D 2,151,000
Total / 17,993,000

Interestingly, those mint marks changed a place after two minting years. Initially, coins produced in 1916 and 1917 contained one of these two letters struck below IN GOD WE TRUST, on the coin obverse.

All others, minted from 1917 to 1947, including the 1946 Walking Liberty half dollars, got the mint mark on the left side under the spruce tree branch, on the coin reverse.

1946 Walking Liberty half dollar

Face value $0.50 (50 cents)
Compound Silver (90%) plus copper
Coin weight 0.40188 troy ounces (12.5 g)
Coin diameter 1.20472 inches (30.6 mm)
Coin thickness 0.07087 inches (1.8 mm)
Edge Reeded
Shape Round

Most collectors consider this fifty-cent coin designed by Adolf Alexander Weinman one of the most beautiful pieces the US Mint ever struck. Its purpose was to glorify peace and prosperity in the US after two world wars and Great Depression.

1946 Walking Liberty half dollar value*

Quality 1946 1946 DDR 1946 S 1946 D
Good $15 $23 $15 $15
Very good $17 $28 $17 $17
Fine $19 $32 $19 $19
Very fine $21 $46 $21 $21
Extra fine $21 $78 $21 $25
AU $23 $144 $28 $40
MS 60 $42 $318 $49 $52
MS 63 $56 $612 $67 $71

*by USA Coin book

The designer showed Liberty draped in a flag, striding forward with a rising sun in front of her feet. The word LIBERTY and the date are struck along the coin rim, while the motto IN GOD WE TRUST is placed in the right field.

A proud American bald eagle is a central figure on the coin reverse. It perches on a tree branch while holding an olive branch in its right claw.

The UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and HALF DOLLAR surround the bird, while the inscription E PLURIBUS UNUM is placed in front.

 

1946 Walking Liberty Half-dollar Types

The 1946 Walking Liberty half dollars were minted during this coin’s second to last mintage year. Three mints produced an average amount of three coin types during this year.

1946 Walking Liberty half dollar

1946 Walking Liberty half dollar
Image

With 12,118,000 Walking Liberty half dollars made in 1946, Philadelphia had the highest mintage among three mints. Interestingly, most pieces were with DDR, making it a standard error.

1946 Walking Liberty half dollar value*

Year Quality
Good Fine Extra fine Uncirculated
1946 $13 $16 $18 $20
1946 S $13 $16 $18 $25
1946 D $13 $16 $22 $32

*by JM Bullion

While low-graded coins are relatively inexpensive, you should pay $30 to $100 for uncirculated pieces. Rare specimens in MS 68 grade are pricey, and dedicated collectors often pay $20,000 to $25,000 to get the best possible coin available on the market.

1946 proof Walking Liberty half dollar

You can find Walking Liberty half-dollar proofs produced for only seven years, but 1946 wasn’t on that list. No proof coins were minted this year.

1946 S Walking Liberty half dollar

1946 S Walking Liberty half dollar

Precisely 3,724,000 S Walking Liberty half dollars were minted in San Francisco, making it the second mint in coins number produced in 1946.

1946 Walking Liberty half dollar value*

Year Quality
Good Fine Extra fine Uncirculated
1946 $8.74 $10.8 $13.1 $25
1946 S $8.74 $10.8 $13.1 $50
1946 D $8.74 $10.8 $14.8 $34

*by CoinStudy

You can quickly find one of these pieces in low grade for $10 to $50. Uncirculated specimens are more expensive, and you should pay $50 to $150 for such a coin.

However, the 1946 MS 68 Walking Liberty half dollar will be costly and can reach $1,300 at auction. The auction record holds the piece in MS 67+ grade sold in 2021 for $38,400.

1946 D Walking Liberty half dollar

1946 D Walking Liberty half dollar

The Denver mint produced 2,151,000 Walking Liberty half dollars in 1946. Depending on the grade, you can buy any of them for $10 to $1,200.

Only 1946 MS 68 Walking Liberty half dollar is pricey and typically costs $10,000 to $14,000. In 2021, one coin in perfect MS 67+ condition was sold for $31,200, making an auction record.

 

1946 Walking Liberty Half Dollar Rarities and Errors

1946 Walking Liberty Half Dollar Rarities and Errors

As I have already mentioned, Doubled Die Reverse error is usual for 1946 Walking Liberty half dollar. It is estimated that most pieces minted in Philadelphia have it.

Typically, a moderate doubling type occurs on the right eagle wing and the Latin saying E PLURIBUS UNUM on the coin reverse. It is large enough to notice it without using a magnifying glass.

Low-rating pieces are not particularly expensive, but you should set aside $1,800 to $2,000 for a coin in MS 65 grade. On the other hand, an MS 66 DDR Walking Liberty half dollar can reach $3,000 to $4,000.

 

1946 Walking Liberty Half-dollar Rating

1946 Walking Liberty Half-dollar Rating

Since 1946 Walking Liberty half dollar is more than a half-century old, finding one in the mint state can be pretty challenging.

Therefore, you should be careful when looking for one. The best option is to have the coin evaluated, but you can do it yourself if you are skillful and follow the precise guidelines.

Uncirculated¬†– The 1946 Walking Liberty half dollar in the mint state is pretty rare and highly appreciated among collectors. It wasn’t used for payment and was kept in bags from the first day of minting.

Therefore, it is impossible to notice any traces of wear on its surface. As expected, such a piece is desirable for collectors and the most expensive on the coin market.

1946 Walking Liberty half dollar value*

Quality 1946 1946 DDR 1946 S 1946 D
Good $9.7 $20 to $30 $9.7 $ 9.7
Very good $9.7 $35 to $50.4 $9.7 $ 9.7
Fine $9.7 $50 to $66 $9.7 $ 9.7
Very fine $9.8 to $10.5 $65 to $98.4 $10.8 to $11.6 $10.8 to $11.6
Extra fine $11.5 to $15 $95 to $138 $15 to $24 $16 to $22.8
AU $15 to $19 $140 to $288 $30 to $50.4 $26 to $31.2
MS 60 $28 to $33.6 $300 to $360 $45 to $54 $28 to $33.6
MS 61 $32 to $38.4 $350 to $420 $45 to $54 $32 to $38.4
MS 62 $36 to $43.2 $450 to $540 $45 to $54 $36 to $43.2
MS 63 $44 to $52.8 $600 to $720 $50 to $60 $44 to $52.8
MS 64 $66 to $79.2 $900 to $1,080 $74 to $88.8 $66 to $79.2
MS 65 $80 to $92 $1,800 to $2,160 $90 to $92 $80 to $92
MS 66 $115 to $135 $3,200 to $3,840 $135 to $162 $135 to $160
MS 67 $820 to $1,000 / $1,050 to $1,300 $800 to $1,200
MS 68 $20,000 to $25,000 / / $10,000 to $14,000

*by Greysheet

Extra fine – Even though this piece looks untouched at first glance, you can see missing luster on the Liberty’s outstretched arm. Sometimes, you will need to use a magnifying glass to recognize slight imperfections on the surface and light signs of wear.

Fine – This half dollar spent some time in circulation so that you can notice clear signs of wear on its surface. The original luster has gone, and the texture is not as refined and elegant as it was.

The first changes are visible on the Liberty’s head and gown that are a bit flattened. Another significant wear is visible on sun rays since their points are faded and have blurred over time.

Good – Since you can see heavy wear on this coin surface, you can guess its value is almost insignificant. Branches have merged with the Liberty’s arm, while her hand has become virtually invisible.

Most letters in inscriptions are barely legible, and they are partially merged with the coin rim. Even though this piece is not particularly desirable among collectors, it has some value thanks to the silver it contains.

 

Summary

Even though the Walking Liberty half dollar production stopped a half-century ago, this coin is still highly collectible. Besides the mint mark and silver content, the vital thing to determine each specimen value is its condition.

You can get one of these coins for a few dollars, but those in high grades can be worth tens of thousands of dollars.

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