How Much is a 1952 Franklin Half Dollar Worth? (Price Chart)

The US Mint produced two half dollar varieties in 1952, the Franklin half dollar and Silver Commemorative Carver-Washington half dollar. Both versions were the most sought coins among investors and collectors for years.

The Benjamin Franklin silver half dollar was minted throughout fifteen years, from 1948 to 1963. It became an excellent investment almost immediately because of silver content, particularly after the Coinage Act reduced this precious metal percentage from circulating coins in 1965. Now, let’s check the 1952 Franklin half dollar value on the current market.

 

1952 Franklin Half Dollar History

1952 Franklin Half Dollar History
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The US economy became stable and started growing in 1952, and the demand for cash increased. As a response, the US Mint produced 52,195,673 Franklin half dollars that year.

1952 Franklin half dollar

Location Year Minted Value
Philadelphia 1952 21,192,093 $11
Philadelphia 1952 proof 81,980 $275
San Francisco 1952 S 5,526,000 $12
Denver 1952 D 25,395,600 $11
Total / 52,195,673 /

The US Mint chief engraver, John R. Sinnock, designed the Franklin half dollar based on Jean Antoine Houdon’s bust statue of one of the most beloved Founding Fathers.

You can see the Liberty Bell on the reverse, a creation of John R. Sinnock and Gilroy Roberts. However, even such an attractive choice couldn’t contribute to this silver coin’s popularity.

1952 Franklin half dollar

Face value 50 cents ($0.5)
Compound 90% silver and 10% copper
Silver weight 0.36169 troy ounces (11.25 g)
Coin weight 0.40188 troy ounces (12.5 g)
Coin diameter 1.2 inches (30.61 mm)
Coin thickness 0.07 inches (1.8 mm)
Shape Round

Three mints struck these coins, but the Denver mint produced about half of the entire production. Even though the mintage in the San Francisco mint was the lowest, these coins are still pretty common.

 

FBL and Non-FBL Franklin Half Dollars

FBL and Non-FBL Franklin Half Dollars
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You can find two Franklin half dollar types produced in 1952:

  • The coin with full bell lines
  • The coin without full bell lines

When you look carefully at the Liberty Bell on the reverse coin side, you will recognize two sets of three horizontal lines each ​across the bell’s lower part. Keep in mind that these lines won’t be visible on worn coins in lower grades.

However, even uncirculated Franklin silver dollars won’t always have clear horizontal lines, and they are often incomplete or faint. The issue appeared during the minting process because the mint didn’t make to strike all pieces appropriately.

1952 Franklin half dollar value*

Quality 1952 1952 S 1952 D
Good $11 $11 $11
Very good $11 $11 $11
Fine $11 $11 $11
Very fine $11 $13 $11
Extra fine $12 $16 $12
About uncirculated $13 $30 $13
MS 60 $14 $50 $14
MS 65 $75 $113 $140
PR 65 $256 / /

*by USA Coin book

For the Franklin half dollar to be FBL, the lines across the bell need to be solid and sharp, particularly at the lower set. Fully struck coins are significantly rare nowadays and precious for collectors.

Most collectors consider only the lower lines, following the Certified Acceptance Corporation and Professional Coin Grading Service standard. On the other hand, the Numismatic Guaranty Corporation always checks the lines across both lower and upper sets.

The FBL designation always means that the Franklin half dollar is well struck without damage and scratches, especially along Liberty Bell lines. Almost all proof coins have full bell lines.

As you have probably guessed, FBL Franklin half dollars are rarer than non-FBL pieces and consequently costly. Plus, you can expect that FBL Franklins are scarce in the MS 66, MS 67, and MS 68 grades.

 

1952 Franklin Half Dollar Types

As with all other Franklin silver coins, three mints produced Franklin half dollar in 1952, including:

  • Philadelphia, which minted silver coins without a particular mint mark
  • San Francisco, which minted silver coins with an S mint mark
  • Denver, which minted silver coins with a D mint mark

1952 Franklin half dollar with no a mint mark

1952 Franklin half dollar with no a mint mark
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The 1952 Franklin half dollar is a common piece nowadays since mints produced millions of these coins that year. With over 50 million half dollars made, the mintage in 1952 was approximately 25% higher than the previous year.

1952 Franklin half dollar value*

Year Extra fine quality
1952 $14
1952  S $17
1952  D $14

*by JM Bullion

Even though this coin is not particularly rare, it is among the scarcer pieces in the series. In other words, you should pay a few tens of dollars for a coin in decent condition, while those in the mint state can be pretty expensive.

1952 Franklin half dollar value*

Quality 1952 1952 S 1952 D
Very good $12 / /
Fine $12 / /
Very fine $12 / /
Extra fine $12.12 / /
AU $13 to $13.2 / /
MS 60 $14.15 / /
MS 61 $14.4 / /
MS 62 $14.7 / /
MS 63 $14.9 / $27 to $33.75
MS 64 $33.75 to $40.5 $780 to $910 $40.5 to $54
MS 65 $54 to $65 $1,500 to 1,880 $101 to $122
MS 66 $162 to $195 $1,880 to $2,810 $560 to $650
MS 67 / $11,200 to $12,600 $11,200 to $12,400

*by Greysheet

Since it is hard to find Franklin half dollar with a full bell line produced in Philadelphia on the coin market, it is always valuable and highly appreciated.

 

1952 proof Franklin half dollar

1952 proof Franklin half dollar
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The Philadelphia mint produced 81,980 proof Franklin half dollars in 1952. Even though it is not a scarce coin, it is always more expensive than regular pieces. The reason is their shine, more prominent details, and full bell lines.

1952 Franklin half dollar value*

Quality 1952 proof
PR 60 $135 to $156
PR 61 $135 to $156
PR 62 $162 to $195
PR 63 $195 to $234
PR 64 $228 to $273
PR 65 $260 to $300
PR 66 $442 to $508
PR 67 $812 to $934
PR 68 $2,500 to $3,000

*by Greysheet

Unfortunately, proof coins minted this particular year are rarely of excellent condition. As a result, you need to pay $2,500 to $3,000 for 1952 PR 68 Franklin half dollar, far cheaper than MS 67 coins produced in San Francisco and Denver.

 

1952 S Franklin half dollar

1952 S Franklin half dollar

The San Francisco mint produced 5,526,000 Franklin half dollars in 1952. You can see the S mint mark on the coin reverse above the Liberty Bell. Since collectors typically look for full bell lines, they care less about the mint mark.

In other words, your coin with full bell lines will be worth more than the non-FBL piece regardless of the mint where it was produced.

1952 Franklin half dollar value*

Quality 1952 1952 S 1952 D
Very fine $8 $8 $8
AU $10 $10 $10
MS 63 $36 $125 $30
MS 64 $80 $430 $80
MS 65 $95 $575 $130
MS 66 $180 $1,950 $630

*by COIN HelpU

 

1952 D Franklin half dollar

1952 D Franklin half dollar

The Denver mint produced 25,395,600 of Franklin half dollars in 1952, which was a record at that time. Surprisingly, these coins are scarce in higher grades nowadays, particularly those above MS 65. It is also in a Bugs Bunny die clash coins group, but this error is barely noticeable.

1952 Franklin half dollar value*

Year Quality
Fine Extra fine About uncirculated Uncirculated
1952 $8.4 $8.4 $9.8 $12
1952  S $8.4 $10 $35 $46
1952  D $8.4 $8.4 $9.8 $12

*by CoinStudy

 

1952 Franklin Half Dollar Rarities and Key Dates

The whole Franklin half dollar series don’t have any rarities or key dates. It is the same with coins minted in 1952, so they are relatively affordable regardless of the grade.

1952 Franklin Half Dollar Grading

1952 Franklin Half Dollar Grading

Uncirculated – Such a coin was never released into circulation, so it looked like it was just minted. You can’t see any traces of use on its surface.

1952 Franklin half dollar value*

Coin Quality
Good Fine Extra fine Uncirculated
1952 $6.5 to $6.75 $6.5 to $6.75 $7 to $7.25 $13+
1952 S $6.5 to $6.75 $6.5 to $6.75 $7 to $7.25 $35+
1952 D $6.5 to $6.75 $6.5 to $6.75 $7 to $7.25 $13+

*by Coinflation

Extra fine – A half dollar in this condition has minor imperfections and a few signs of wear and tear on the surface. However, you will probably need to use a magnifying glass to see most of them.

Fine – This piece is moderately damaged. You can see scratches over the surface and clear signs of wear and tear with the naked eye.

1952 Franklin half dollar value*

Quality 1952 1952 S 1952 D
Good $16 $16 $16
Very good $16.4 $17 $16.4
Fine $16.6 $18 $16.6
Very fine $16.9 $20 $16.9
Extra fine $17.6 $21 $17.6
About uncirculated $19 $28.5 $19
MS 60 $23.75 $30.5 $33.25
MS 65 $57 $95 $135
PF 65 $275 / /

*by Hobbizine

Good – Unfortunately, this coin is significantly damaged, so you will hardly recognize details on its surface.

 

Summary

If you are one of the collectors who appreciate Franklin half dollars, you should purchase a desirable FBL piece. Such a coin will cost more, but you can always treat it as an investment and re-sell it when needed.

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