How Much is a 1950 Franklin Half Dollar Worth? (Price Chart)

The US Mint struck the Franklin half dollar series from 1948 to 1963. Thanks to many preserved pieces you can find on the coin market, it is pretty uncomplicated to complete the 1950 set. Most collectors prefer purchasing widespread and affordable specimens in the mint state.

The 1950 Franklin half dollar value primarily depends on its condition, and you should pay particular attention to pricey Full Steps specimens. However, even the most heavily damaged coins will be worth something on the current precious metal market. Those in higher grades carry additional historical value, making them highly collectible nowadays.

1950 Franklin Half Dollar History

In 1948, US Mint chief engraver John Sinnock designed the Franklin half dollar. The former President’s image was based on the statue that Jean Antoine Houdon made in the 18th century.

Three mints produced this American coin during the minting period from 1948 to 1963, but only Philadelphia and Denver struck them in 1950.

1950 Franklin half dollar

Location Year Minted Price
Philadelphia 1950 7,742,123 $11
Philadelphia 1950 proof 51,386 $550
Denver 1950 D 8,031,600 $11
Total / 15,825,109

You can see the Franklin bust facing right on the coin obverse surrounded by words LIBERTY above, and IN GOD WE TRUST bellow it. The simple, unpretentious design also includes the date.

1950 Franklin half dollar

Face value $0.50 (50 cents)
Compound 0.900 Silver with copper
Coin weight 0.40188 troy ounces (12.5 g)
Silver weight 0.36169 troy ounces (11.25 g)
Coin diameter 1.20512 inches (30.61 mm)
Coin thickness 0.07087 inches (1.8 mm)
Shape Round
Edge Reeded

The coin reverse is more packed and shows the Liberty Bell, the symbol of American liberty in the 19th century. You can read UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and the HALF DOLLAR denomination along the rim.

The small motto E PLURIBUS UNUM is struck on the right side, while a tiny American eagle spreads its wings on the right side of the famous bell. You can also see a small letter D above the bell yoke in coins produced in Denver.

 

1950 Franklin Half Dollar Types

1950 Franklin half dollar

1950 Franklin half dollar
Image

The Philadelphia mint produced 7,742,123 Franklin half dollars in 1950 or only slightly less than half of the total mintage. These coins are not particularly expensive in low grades, and you can purchase one for $9 to $18.

1950 Franklin half dollar value*

Quality 1950 1950 D
Good $11.5 $11.5
Very good $11.5 $11.5
Fine $11.5 $11.5
Very fine $11.5 $11.5
Extra fine $12.8 $12.8
AU $20 $18
MS 60 $31 $26
MS 65 $124 $289
Proof 65 $537 /

*by USA Coin book

High rating pieces will cost approximately $15 to $300, but you need to set aside $2,500 to $3,000 for a rare specimen with an MS 67 rating.

That number will be even higher when you want to add a Full Bells piece to your collection. The most costly ones come in a price range of $4,200 to almost $5,000. The auction record of $39,600 holds the 1950 MS 67+ FBL Franklin half dollar sold in 2018.

1950 proof Franklin half dollar

1950 proof Franklin half dollar
Image

Precisely 51,386 proof Franklin half dollars came from Philadelphia in 1950. You should set aside $250 to $3,000 to get one, depending on their preservation level.

1950 proof Franklin half dollar value*

Quality 1950 proof 1950 proof CAM 1950 proof DCAM
PR 50 $250 / /
PR 53 $255 / /
PR 55 $265 / /
PR 58 $275 / /
PR 60 $300 to $345 / /
PR 61 $305 to $350.75 $325 to $373.75 /
PR 62 $325 to $373.75 $375 to $431.25 /
PR 63 $350 to $402.5 $500 to $575 $5,000 to $6,000
PR 64 $400 to $460 $725 to $870 $7,500 to $9,000
PR 65 $500 to $575 $1,350 to $1,900 $20,000 to $35,000
PR 66 $750 to $840 $2,900 to $3,300 $35,000 to $50,000
PR 67 $2,650 to $3,050 $6,500 to $9,000 $60,000 to $75,000
PR 68 $19,000 to $21,850 $40,000 to $45,000 /

*by Greysheet

It is estimated that a PR 68 graded piece can reach a price of $19,000 to $22,000. However, the most expensive known coin in a PR 65 grade won an auction record of $44,650 in 2017.

1950 D Franklin half dollar

1950 D Franklin half dollar

Interestingly, 8,031,600 Franklin half dollars of 15,825,109 produced in 1950 were minted in Denver. Thanks to high mintage, coins with the D mint mark in low grades are of low value on the current market, and you can buy such a piece for $9 to $20.

Things are different with specimens in the mint state. They are considered the second most valuable in the series and typically cost up to $850.

1950 Franklin half dollar value*

Year Quality
Fine Extra fine AU Uncirculated
1950 $8.4 $8.4 $10.3 $18
1950 D $8.4 $8.4 $10 $15.8

*by CoinStudy

The 1950 D Full Bell Franklin half dollars are costly, and you should set aside about $900 to $1,200 for a piece with an MS 66 rating. A scarce specimen in an MS 67 grade can reach an impressive $25,000 to $28,750.

The auction record of $32,400 was paid for the most pricey 1950 D MS 67 FBL Franklin half dollar in 2020.

 

1950 Franklin Half Dollar Variation

1950 Franklin Half Dollar Variation

Franklin halves have two variations:

  • FBL with Full bell lines
  • Non-FBL without Full Bell lines

1950 Franklin half dollar value*

Quality 1950 1950 Full Bell 1950 D 1950 D Full Bell
Very good $9 / $9 /
Fine $9 / $9 /
Very fine $9 / $9 /
Extra fine $9.1 / $9.1 /
AU $12 to $18 / $13 to $21.6 /
MS 60 $16 to $19.2 / $21 to $25.2 /
MS 61 $17 to $20.4 / $22 to $26.4 /
MS 62 $20 to $24 / $23 to $27.6 /
MS 63 $26 to $31.2 / $24.2 to $29.1 /
MS 64 $40 to $48 $65 to $78 $32 to $38.4 $65 to $78
MS 65 $85 to $102 $140 to $180 $150 to $172.5 $175 to $225
MS 66 $250 to $287.5 $400 to $450 $743 to $854.4 $900 to $1,200
MS 67 $2,500 to $3,000 $4,200 to $4,830 / $25,000 to $28,750

*by Greysheet

Most 1950 Franklin half dollars come with blurred or discontinued lines because of marks, planchet defects, or inadequate strikes. Unlike those standard pieces, an FBL variety has uninterrupted horizontal lines on the Liberty Bell placed on the coin reverse.

Keep in mind that only specimens in the mint state and proofs can get the FLB mark. These coins are rare, particularly in MS 66, MS 67, and MS 68 grades.

 

1950 Franklin Half Dollar Grading

1950 Franklin Half Dollar Grading

The 1950 Franklin half dollar has never been among favorite American coins but has its fans. Since this coin contains 90% silver, it will always be worth some money regardless of the condition.

Thanks to its historical significance, its price is typically higher than silver bullion value, and some specimens can be pretty costly.

Uncirculated – Franklin half dollars in this grade look unscathed and brand new. They kept original mint luster, fully intact images, and clear inscriptions with sharply separated letters. You will enjoy delicate details on the surface without any signs of wear.

1950 Franklin half dollar value*

Quality 1950 1950 D
Good $16.2 $16.2
Very good $16.4 $16.4
Fine $16.6 $16.6
Very fine $16.9 $16.9
Extra fine $17.6 $17.6
AU $23.7 $23.7
MS 60 $28.5 $28.5
MS 65 $105 $285
PR 65 $570 /

*by Hobbizine

Extra fine – This coin typically has minor, barely visible imperfections on the surface. Sometimes, you can’t tell it apart from an uncirculated piece without using a magnifying glass.

The first changes appear in letters and hair strands at Franklin’s head top. Most people won’t notice slight flattening on higher design areas, and only top numismatics experts can give the final judge of this specimen condition.

Fine – You can see some scratches on this coin’s surface, while its design is a bit flattened and luster doesn’t exist anymore.

In fact, it looks dull and discolored, while significant signs of wear are visible on Franklin’s face and inscriptions. The President’s head top is often missing, while hair waves behind the ear start merging.

1950 Franklin half dollar value*

Quality 1950 1950 D
Good / $8.6
Very good $6.4 $8.6
Fine $7.8 $8.6
Very fine $7.8 $8.6
Extra fine $11 $8.6
AU $12 $10
Uncirculated $24 $40

*by Numista

Good – The Franklin half dollar in such a low grade spent years in circulation, making it worn out with numerous scratches and even bending.

Its color is typically faded, while most details are barely visible, and most inscriptions are illegible. However, this piece will have basic silver bullion value even in the worst possible condition.

 

Summary

The 1959 Franklin half dollar is not a particularly precious piece, but most collectors appreciate it because of its historical significance. Thanks to their availability, you can collect specimens in the mint state without spending too much money. Only highly-grading coins with Full Steps are pricey and relatively scarce.

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